PROLOGUE
1ST DETROIT SERVICE
SHULS
1ST HEBREW DELRAY
AARON ISRAEL [STOLINER]
ADAS YESHURN [TYLER]
ADAT SHALOM
AHAVATH ZION
AMARATH TEMPLE
AVAS ACHIM [DELMAR]
AVAS ACHIM 2
BETH AARON
BETH AARON V ISRAEL
BETH ABRAHAM
BETH ABRAHAM 2
B'NAI DAVID
BETH EL [BONSTELLE]
BETH EL
BETH EMMANUEL [TAYLOR]
BETH ITZCHOCK
BETH MOSES
BETH MOSES 2
BETH MOSES [OWEN]
B'NAI MOSHE
BETH SCHMUEL
BETH TICHVAH [PETOSKEY]
BETH YEHUDA
B'NAI ISRAEL
B'NAI ISRAEL 2
B'NAI JACOB
B'NAI JACOB
B'NAI ZION [HUMPHREY]
DOWNTOWN SYNAGOGUE
EL MOSHE
EZRAS ACHIM TUROVER
HERES ISRAEL
MISHKAN YISROEL
NUSACH HARI
SHAAREY SHOMAYIM [FENKELL]
SHAAREY TORAH
SHAAREY ZEDEK
SHAAREY ZION [PIGGLY WIGGLY]
TEMPLE ISRAEL
INSTITUTIONS
BETH DAVID CEMETERY
BETH EL ELMWOOD CEMETERY
BETH OLEM CEMETERY
BUTZEL BUILDING
FREE BURIAL ASSN
JCC MEYERS
JCC WOODWARD
JEWISH WELFARE FED
MANUEL URBACH
SHAAREY ZEDEK SCHOOL
SINAI HOSPITAL
THE SCHVITZ
TUSHIYAH UHS
UHS DELMAR
YESHIVA BETH YEHUDA & MOGEN AVROM

Prologue

THE LOST SYNAGOGUES OF DETROIT

They are beautiful. They are poignant. In their totality the former synagogues of Detroit outline once closely knit neighborhoods from the days when Detroit was a conglomerate of vibrant immigrant and ethnic communities, of a time when families walked to places of worship which stood in the midst of their neighborhoods.

Standing alone amid tall grasses and wild flowers of the urban wilderness, it is difficult to believe the former Shaarey Torah Synagogue on Brush was once squeezed in to a densely built and populated neighborhood.

In my wanderings through the near west side of Detroit I noticed, over time, a large number of finely-appointed synagogues that are now, for the most part, thriving Afro American Christian churches.

Remnants of removed a Star of David can be faintly detected on the facade of the former Free Burial Association, now the Bibleway Temple for Better Living church, on Joy Road.

My first attraction was to the buildings which, for the most part, are both beautiful and poignant. They outlined a story of days where Detroit was a conglomerate of closely knit communities.

Today only Hamtramck vaguely continues in that mode, the days of foot traffic and local shops, times when folks walked to their place of worship which stood in the midst of their neighborhoods. The synagogues' grandness also manifest the silent triumph of a community which, at the time they rose, was still highly discriminated against. The story is dynamic on several levels.

Come with me as I explore this intriguing facet of Detroit history and help me in getting the facts straight. Do you have facts or stories about any of these synagogues or churches? I want to hear them. Join the others who are contributing their memories and knowledge in this self-writing tour.

On each page you will see the following invitation:

We welcome and invite you to share your memories of Detroit's former synagogues and Jewish sites.
Email your memories to us » and we will add them to the site.

Your memories will be greatly appreciated and credited.

Remains of a removed bas relief menorah on Temple Beth Emmanuel / Tried Stone Baptist Church.

 

The Lost Synagogues of Detroit
Techtown Detroit | 444 Burroughs, Ste. 136 | Detroit, MI | 888-474-8189 ext. 1
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