PROLOGUE
1ST DETROIT SERVICE
SHULS
1ST HEBREW DELRAY
AARON ISRAEL [STOLINER]
ADAS YESHURN [TYLER]
ADAT SHALOM
AHAVATH ZION
AMARATH TEMPLE
AVAS ACHIM [DELMAR]
AVAS ACHIM 2
BETH AARON
BETH AARON V ISRAEL
BETH ABRAHAM
BETH ABRAHAM 2
B'NAI DAVID
BETH EL [BONSTELLE]
BETH EL
BETH EMMANUEL [TAYLOR]
BETH ITZCHOCK
BETH MOSES
BETH MOSES 2
BETH MOSES [OWEN]
B'NAI MOSHE
BETH SCHMUEL
BETH TICHVAH [PETOSKEY]
BETH YEHUDA
B'NAI ISRAEL
B'NAI ISRAEL 2
B'NAI JACOB
B'NAI JACOB
B'NAI ZION [HUMPHREY]
DOWNTOWN SYNAGOGUE
EL MOSHE
EZRAS ACHIM TUROVER
HERES ISRAEL
MISHKAN YISROEL
NUSACH HARI
SHAAREY SHOMAYIM [FENKELL]
SHAAREY TORAH
SHAAREY ZEDEK
SHAAREY ZION [PIGGLY WIGGLY]
TEMPLE ISRAEL
INSTITUTIONS
BETH DAVID CEMETERY
BETH EL ELMWOOD CEMETERY
BETH OLEM CEMETERY
BUTZEL BUILDING
FREE BURIAL ASSN
JCC MEYERS
JCC WOODWARD
JEWISH WELFARE FED
MANUEL URBACH
SHAAREY ZEDEK SCHOOL
SINAI HOSPITAL
THE SCHVITZ
TUSHIYAH UHS
UHS DELMAR
YESHIVA BETH YEHUDA & MOGEN AVROM


CLICK IMAGE FOR FULL VIEW OF AHAVATH ZION

Ahavath Zion
Holbrook at Brush

Now
Alpha and Omega Spiritual Church of Christ

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Shared Memories of Ahavath Zion

This congregation built on the Eastside of Woodward and was here 1921-38. The cornerstone is written in Hebrew with the letters corresponding to the Hebrew year 5681 (1920-21). 2001 is 5761 for reference. At the time, this was a vibrant Jewish neighborhood where members could walk to shul.The building is called Ahavath Zion, "Love of Zion" reflecting the creation of a Jewish homeland in Palestine. On the exterior are the usage of Hebrew, Yiddish, and English languages. "Cong. Ahavath Zion" is written in English to announce that it is located in an American city, yet, just above the door, closer to the passing members, in Hebrew is a Yiddishized "Cong. Ahavah Zion". The cornerstone is Hebrew for the year 5681. With Jewish prosperity post war, native-born sons and daughters moved swiftly from this area up to and beyond Seven Mile Road and West of Woodward Avenue. Jewish hospital, shopping, The JCC, etc. moved so this orthodox building had to be left behind too. It must be remembered that the orthodox care to walk to shul on Shabbos, so when older members die out and younger ones move away, the buildings are abandoned.

Arnie

My maternal grandfather, Charles Gordon, spent almost every day of his life during my memory (early 1930s to about 1940) in this synagogue in prayer. He and his immediate family, wife, my mother and her brother immigrated from Russian Poland, Lublin, in 1905. The lived in a two family I believe at the corner of John R and Holbrook. My grandparents lived downstairs and my father mother and sister and I lived upstairs until my mother died in 1932. To the best of my recollection and in discussion with my sister the congregation was almost entirely immigrant Jews from southeastern Poland which when they immigrated was under Russian sovereignty. It was of course an orthodox congregation but not Hassidim. It was a time when the men prayed on the first floor and the women had to sit in the balcony.
Ron

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