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CLICK PICTURES FOR MORE B'NAI ISRAEL



B'nai Israel
[from 1920-1925]
Ferry at Beaubien

Now
Third Baptist Church 

As Detroit grew rapidly in the early 20th Century the Detroit's Jewish community gradually moved north yet remained largely on the eastside [east of Woodward Ave. in Detroit] where a second shtetlhood locus in the areas to the east of Detroit's New Center with a rough center of East Grand Blvd. and Hastings Street. [Now Interstate 75]

Several sites remain from that era with B'nai Israel being the furthest south remaining synagogue. The second iteration of the Shaarey Zedek was nearby as was the next site the Tushiyah United Hebrew Schools.